Categories ArchivesAdvocacy

Traffic Safety Act – Our Recommendations

Photo from the Cabot Trail by Tim Foster on Unsplash Did you know that Nova Scotia’s outdated Motor Vehicle Act is being replaced with a modern Traffic Safety Act? It’s great news for all road users, given that the original Motor Vehicle Act is now almost 100 years old! The last major revision to the legislation was back in 1989, so an overhaul is long overdue, given how much things have changed since then. The Province of Nova Scotia says the new regulations “include improvements to help keep pedestrians safe” and “measures to better protect cyclists,” among many other updates. One major win is right in the title of the new act: instead of focusing strictly on the use of motor vehicles, ...

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HRM Bicycle Networks in Jeopardy

Anybody who rides a bicycle knows the challenges of riding in traffic. You might start your trip on a local street or a rural road, but sooner or later (usually sooner) you hit a busy arterial, speedy highway, or difficult intersection. Although seasoned riders can often cope with high traffic speeds and volumes, for most riders this can be a major deterrent to cycling. As long as riders have to contend with and behave like cars (which they are not), cycling’s tremendous potential will be held back.   Streets Designed for All Ages and Abilities Changing attitudes about our transportation system has led to new planning and design ideas that recognize the limitations of mixing cars and bikes and seek ways to disentangle them. ...

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Have your say in Nova Scotia’s new “Traffic Safety Act”

This fall, the Nova Scotia government plans to introduce a new Traffic Safety Act to replace the out-dated Motor Vehicle Act, which has not been rewritten since the 1920’s. Bicycle Nova Scotia has been working with other partners in the province to push for changes to this legislation. Reviewing the act, we are suggesting that the public advocate for 5 changes that will have significant impact for the safety and rights of cyclists in the province.   The top 5 changes that need to be included in the new Traffic Safety Act are: Recognize and define Vulnerable Road Users under the new Traffic Safety Act Allow for a municipal council to direct their traffic authority to set speed limits under 50 km/hour, without the need to seek permission ...

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Have your say in Nova Scotia’s new “Traffic Safety Act”

This fall, the Nova Scotia government plans to introduce a new Traffic Safety Act to replace the out-dated Motor Vehicle Act, which has not been rewritten since the 1920’s.   Bicycle Nova Scotia has been working with other partners in the province to push for changes to this legislation. Reviewing the act, we are suggesting that the public advocate for 5 changes that will have significant impact for the safety and rights of cyclists in the province.   The top 5 changes that need to be included in the new Traffic Safety Act are: Recognize and define Vulnerable Road Users under the new Traffic Safety Act Allow for a municipal council to direct their traffic authority to set speed limits under 50 km/hour, without the need to seek permission ...

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Fall River Bike Lane to Add New Piece of the Blue Route

Last Tuesday, Halifax Regional Council approved the addition of bike lanes to a 1.5km section of Fall River Road as part of the Fall River Water Service Extension project. The project is expected to be complete in the spring of 2018. The bike lanes factor into plans for the River-Lake Greeway, which will connect Dartmouth, Fall River, and north towards Elmsdale. That route is part of plans for the Blue Route Provincial Cycling Network within HRM.   Read the staff ...

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Do Your Part to “Shape Your City”

HRM is asking residents to share their ideas about priorities for the 2017 Budget. An online forum and budget allocator tool is now open at Shape Your City. Let’s tell Councilors that it’s time to invest in bicycle networks that are safe, well connected, and work for everybody!   Good bicycle networks are relatively small municipal investments that have big benefits. Safe, practical networks open up a healthy, affordable, green and convenient form of transportation for people of all ages and abilities. Networks connecting trail and pathway systems provide accessible multipurpose recreational facilities.   Bicycling isn’t just good for us; it’s good for our cities. Other jurisdictions are taking note: Calgary and Edmonton are just the latest Canadian cities making headlines for rapid construction ...

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